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Mortgage Blog

In a tough economy borrowers worry about foreclosure and bankruptcy, and the effects such issues can have on the ability to borrow. One big topic these days regarding FHA loans involves the required waiting period for new FHA home loans after filing bankruptcy or foreclosure.

A good example of a frequently asked question in this area: "When does the waiting period began per FHA Guidelines? If you included a conventional loan in a Chapter 7 bankruptcy, does the waiting period began at the discharge date? Or does the waiting period began at the trustee sale?"

After Chapter 7 bankruptcy, (not to be confused with Chapter 13 bankruptcy rules) the borrower must wait out the FHA's minimum "seasoning" period. At the time of this writng, that period is two years plus any additional amount required by the lender. Some banks will require that a borrower wait a total of three years before applying for a new home loan.

Other lenders may be willing to work with qualified borrowers after the FHA two-year minimum for Chapter 7, but it is important to note that the required waiting period begins from the time the bankruptcy is discharged--NOT the time the bankruptcy is filed.

Here is some additional information on waiting periods and other requirements for both Chapter 13 and Chapter 7 bankruptcy:

CHAPTER 13 BANKRUPTCY WAITING PERIODS

FHA rules allow a lender to consider approving an FHA loan application from a borrower who is still paying on a Chapter 13 Bankruptcy-but only if those payments have been made and verified for a period of at least one year.

The borrower isn't automatically able to apply for a new FHA loan if they meet this requirement--the court trustee's written approval is a condition of the policy. Additionally, the borrower must write a detailed explanation of the bankruptcy and submit it with the loan application. The borrower must have good credit, a satisfactory employment history and other financial qualifications.

CHAPTER 7 BANKRUPTCY WAITING PERIODS

As mentioned above, all borrowers must wait least two years after the discharge date of a Chapter 7 Bankruptcy. The discharge date should not be confused with the date bankruptcy was filed.

As with Chapter 13 bankruptcy, FHA regulations demand a full explanation to be submitted with the FHA home loan application. To get a new FHA insured mortgage loan after Chapter 7, the borrower must qualify financially, establish a history of good credit in the wake of the filing of the Chapter 7, and meet other FHA requirements.


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Posted by Jill Kohler on October 28th, 2016 9:33 PM

FHA Loan

FHA loans are the new most popular mortgage loan. During the housing boom, subprime mortgages were all the rage. But as the housing market fell apart, lending standards tightened and the benefits of FHA mortgages are more prevalent.  FHA is a good alternative to for first time buyers to be able to qualify and become a homeowner even though they don't have a large amount of cash to put down.

You can borrow 96.5% of the value of the home. You only need to come up with a 3.50% downpayment. Minimum credit scores are typically lower, as well as you won’t be disqualified if you have a bankruptcy or foreclosure. With FHA loans, you can also refinance with them. You need to be current on your payments, but you may not need to get your home appraised. And typically there is a lot less paperwork involved. FHA currently allows sellers to contribute up to 6% towards the buyers closing costs. Lastly, FHA loans come with fixed rates. Many reasons homeowners got into trouble was their mortgages were adjustable rates and their monthly payments became very unstable.

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Posted by Jill Kohler on October 17th, 2016 4:26 PM

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